Faulty Analysis Labels Drug Courts As Fraudulent

Crime and Consequences has a guest post written by Steven K. Erickson entitled “The Drug Court Fraud”. Erickson correctly criticizes the methodology used to boost statistics about the efficacy of drug courts. Some of the valid points he makes in his paper are that studies often leave out the initial drop out rate when publishing success statistics, that entry into drug courts is non-random, and that short follow up periods leave us without vitally important long term efficacy rates for these programs.

As I said, these are all valid points, when we are talking about whether or not there is a scientifically proven cause and effect between drug courts and long term sobriety.  But Erickson continues:

Completion rates for many drug court studies range form 25 to 66 percent. Thus, up to 2/3 of the initial participants do not complete treatment. If this is success, I’d hate to see what failure is.

We already know what failure is, Dr. Erickson. It’s currently our only alternative to drug courts in most places: long term expensive incarceration of addicts.

So while you make admittedly valid criticisms of methodology, don’t forget that most of modern medicine is based on epidemiological studies, which as a whole suffer from many of the same flaws. Epidemiology never proves causation. And yet, in some cases it is the only available method of study.

And even if drug courts only keep 10% of controlled substance offenders out of our prison system, they are a massive success. At 33% we ought to be dancing in the streets. You don’t have to read too many stories about Drug Court successes to know they are well worth it.

Trackbacks (0) Links to blogs that reference this article Trackback URL
http://blog.austindefense.com/admin/trackback/15250
Comments (1) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Sophie Kinsella - August 7, 2012 1:53 AM

Hello,

I am Sophie Kinsella, a full time guest blogger. I came across your site ''blog[.]austindefense[.]com" while surfing on Google to see some good articles on finance. I am impressed with some valuable information there.

I can offer you free of charge content for your web site, in return for a link back to our site. The content will be unique and informative to your web site and there are definitely no costs or other commitments for you.

As soon as the content gets live, I will provide social media promotion to drive traffic to the article.

Please don't hesitate to ask any follow-up question.


Thanks,
Sophie Kinsella

Post A Comment / Question Use this form to add a comment to this entry.







Remember personal info?