This morning, my all time unique-IP address count of visitors reads 513,432, so I missed the mark by a week or two. Serves me right for not paying enough attention to my blog as of late.

Ron:

Regarding what we talked about in court the other day, my last post didn’t quite fit the bill. So I had to write another. This should do the trick.

JS

P.S. Thanks for reminding me.
 

I’m about to go argue a writ of habeas corpus in Austin Muni Court, for a Class C No Insurance conviction from about a year and a half ago. Client attempted to pay some outstanding speeding tickets and the monies were wrongly applied to an FMFR that was pending.

When she returned a few days later with proof of insurance to get the dismissal, she was told “too late, we already convicted you when you came to the counter with money for the other ticket.” She filed a few motions for new trial – pro se – which were denied as untimely, and the case ended up in my hands after a few referrals and through UT Student Legal Services.

Should be fun. I wonder whether the prosecutor will say “Not Timely” in response to my writ. As if that applies…

[By the way, I don’t handle traffic tickets, and I make up my own mind what I’ll do pro bono, so don’t call me if you think you fall into either of those categories.]
 

Late on a Thursday several years ago I was waiting for an after hours appointment that was a few minutes late. And it had been a long week already.

The potential new client(PNC) arrives and we sit down to chat about his case. He’s about to be indicted in Travis County for felony DWI, and he’s going around interviewing lawyers to see who he wants to hire. Fair enough, that’s what free consultations are for.

Continue Reading Why Should I Hire You Instead Of…? (Another True Story)

Certainly the most gullible among us must wonder at times why the get rich quick gurus advertising on late night TV don’t make millions for themselves by using their own repossessed real estate advice, instead of selling all of us shmucks the secrets to eternal wealth for just three-easy-payments of $99.

Continue Reading Those Who Can, Do

Sometimes I want to write a post about “what happened in court today” but there are a few considerations that usually prevent me from doing it.

1) Dockets are a public record. For all intents and purposes, this means if I admit I’m talking about something that happened literally today, then I’m potentially letting the cat out of the bag. The exact “who” is protected by attorney client privilege; the precise “where” – which county, which court – is rarely necessary for the point of the story; it’s the “what” happened part that (may) be worth blogging.

Continue Reading A Note On War Stories And Blogging

Because 7-8-9.

[Two quick excuses: Sorry for being corny, but the twins are about to turn three, and my humor literally tends to run on the juvenile side these days – yes, more juvenile than before I had children. Also, I don’t expect to be alive a hundred years from now, so if I’m ever going to post this “joke”, then today’s the day to do it.]
 

No texting in court. Reminds me of back when I started practicing(1997), cell phones were just becoming common in every day life. More and more lawyers were changing out their pagers for cell phones.

In those dark ages, however, every phone’s ring sounded virtually identical. You didn’t have several options, just the default; and you sure couldn’t download the latest Britney Spears tune as your ringtone.

Continue Reading Signs of the Times