From tomorrow’s Wall Street Journal headlines:

Premier anti-“Drug War” crusader Pete Guither wants to banish the idea that the U.S. is fighting "a war on drugs," a move that would underscore a shift favoring treatment over incarceration in trying to reduce illicit drug use.

Guither said Wednesday the bellicose analogy was a barrier to dealing with the nation’s drug issues.

"Regardless of how you try to explain to people it’s a ‘war on drugs’ or a ‘war on a product,’ people see a war as a war on them," he said. "We’re not at war with people in this country."

I’ve subscribed to Drug WarRant since before I started blogging, and I admire the hell out of Guither. He puts in a lot of mostly thankless hours keeping us little “l” libertarians abreast of all the insanities regarding the War on Drug Addicts that has helped propel America to the top of the heap.

Unfortunately, most people will assume that he’s just a dope smoking hippie that wants your babies, your precious little angels to start smoking crack. I mean, that’s what being against the Drug War is really about, right?

What we need is a Drug Czar with this same attitude. Well, I’ve got some good news for you. I cheated. Here’s the real story from the WSJ:

The Obama administration’s new drug czar says he wants to banish the idea that the U.S. is fighting "a war on drugs," a move that would underscore a shift favoring treatment over incarceration in trying to reduce illicit drug use.

In his first interview since being confirmed to head the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, Gil Kerlikowske said Wednesday the bellicose analogy was a barrier to dealing with the nation’s drug issues.

"Regardless of how you try to explain to people it’s a ‘war on drugs’ or a ‘war on a product,’ people see a war as a war on them," he said. "We’re not at war with people in this country."

Long way to go, but I’ll settle for being headed in the right direction.

The article also quotes this douchebag James Pasco:

James Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, the nation’s largest law-enforcement labor organization, said that while he holds Mr. Kerlikowske in high regard, police officers are wary.

"While I don’t necessarily disagree with Gil’s focus on treatment and demand reduction, I don’t want to see it at the expense of law enforcement. People need to understand that when they violate the law there are consequences."

“I don’t want to see it at the expense of law enforcement?” Sounds like you’re mostly worried that reversing/ending the War on Drugs is like repealing the Perpetual Funding For Police Act.